Regional Security Complex in Central Asia

General Information
Teacher: 
dr Marek Musioł
Room: 
103
ECTS: 
2
Number of Hours: 
20
Tuesday 11:30 - 13:00
Preliminary requirements: 

The preliminary requirements in order to take part in this seminar, refer to the general knowledge concerning main factors and aspects ruling the international relations and security. It is also highly recommended to track current, international developments and know the history particularly after the Second World War and the Cold War that might influence on a contemporary perspective. 

Course Description: 

The aim of this seminar is to analyze basic aspects in the context of Central Asian republics. The presented literature might be also changed by the teacher and the final list with positions in electronic versions or hard copies will be provided a week before the exact meeting. 

The structural framework of the workshop: 

All seminars are scheduled for Mondays in the academic year 2017/2018 (with the accordance to below dates and hours). Any possible changes will be announced by the teacher before each meeting. 

26.02.2018 (1,5 h): Introduction

15.30-17.00
 how to complete this seminar - organizational aspects and requirements.
 a team work and first step to integrate better: icebreaker game – it is not easy to communicate. 

12.03.2018 (1,5 h): 15.30-17.00
The multi cycle’s new world order and global security’s challenges – workshop and practical task 

M. Stone, Security According to Buzan: A Comprehensive Security Analysis, Columbia University, New York 2009.
S. Smallman, K. Brown, Introduction to International and Global Studies, The University of North Carolina 2011. 

26.03.2018 (1,5 h): The Regional Security Complex Theory, Theory of Securitisation, Regionalism 15.30-17.00 

B. Buzan, O. Waever, Regions and Powers. The Structure of International Security, “Cambridge Studies in International Relations”, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2003.
W. Kostecki, Europe After the Cold War. The security complex theory, Instytut Studiów Politycznych PAN, Warszawa 1996. 

J. A. Vuori, Illocutionary Logic and Strands of Securitization: Applying the Theory of Securitization to the Study of Non-Democratic Political Orders, “European Journal of International Relations”, 14 (1), 2008.
T. Balzacq, Constructivism and Securitization Studies, [in:] Cavelty M. D., Mauer V. (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Routledge, Abingdon (UK), New York 2010. 

P. Roe, Actor, Audience(s) and Emergency Measures: Securitization and the UK’s Decision to Invade Iraq, Security Dialogue, vol. 39, no. 6, 2008.
V. Šulovic, Meaning of Security and the Theory of Securitization, BCSP, Belgrade 2010.
M. C. Williams, Words, Images, Enemies: Securitization and International Politics, “International Studies Quarterly”, 47, 2003. 

M. Musioł, Specificity of contemporary Central Asian regionalism, Roczniki Nauk Społecznych, Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski, 2015. 

09.04.2018 (1,5 h): Democracy and liberal standards in the Central Asian Republics? - debate 

23.04.2018 (1,5 h): Central Asia – historical and geographical background 15.30-17.00
S. Blank, China’s silk roads and their challenges, Central Asia, Caucasus Analyst, 07.01.2015. 

  1. A. Bohr, Central Asia: responding to the multi-vectoring game, Chatham House 22.02.2010. 

  2. R. L. Canfield, Restructuring in Greater Central Asia: Changing Political Configurations, Asian Survey, Vol. 

    32, No. 10 (1992). 

  3. A. Nikitin, The End of the “Post-Soviet Space” The Changing Geopolitical Orientations of the Newly 

    Independent States, Chatham House, Russia and Eurasia Briefing Paper, REP BP 07/01, luty 2007. 

  4. M. B. Olcott, Eyes on Central Asia: How to Understand the Winners and Losers, http://src- 

    h.slav.hokudai.ac.jp/coe21/publish/no16_1_ses/01_olcott.pdf. 

  5. R. Pomfret, Central Asia after Two Decades of Independence, Working Paper No. 2010/53, UNU-WIDER 2010, 

    United Nations University, May 2010. 

The Central Asia economic affairs and social structure – nation, nationalism, language as a basis of the new national identity 

J. Falkingham, The End of the Rollercoaster? Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Central Asia and the Caucasus, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2005.
M. Shafi, Central Asia. Economy, Enviroment and Culture, Rawat Publications, New Delhi 2007.
A. Bohr, Kazakhstan: End of the Banking Boom, REP Programme Paper, Chatham House, 11.05.2009. 

M. P. Barry, Foreign Direct Investments in Central Asian Energy: A CGE Model, “Eurasian Journal of Business and Economics”, 2009.
The Politics of Decision-Making in Central Asia, REP Seminar Summary, Chatham House, 11.06.2009. Human Development Report 2016, UNDP, 2016. 

The Aral Sea Syndrome (film). 

07.05.2018 (1,5 h): Central Asia – political implications and the future of regimes 15.30-17.00 

R. Pomfret, Central Asia after Two Decades of Independence, Working Paper No. 2010/53, UNU-WIDER 2010, United Nations University, May 2010.
G. Giinsburg, Recent History of the Territorial Question in Central Asia, “Central Asia Monitor”, 3, 1992.
A. Matveeva, Democratization, legitimacy and political change in Central Asia, “International Affairs”, Vol. 75, No. 1, 1999. 

R. Mirzohid, G. Urazaeva, Central Asia Nations and Border issues, Conflict Studies Research Center, “Central Asia Series”, UK. 05/10, 2005. 

Eurasian Balkans - tensions and conflicts in Central Asia 

P. K. Baev, Assessing Russia’s Cards: Three Petty Games in Central Asia, “Cambridge Review of International Affairs”, Vol. 17, Nr. 2, lipiec 2004.
J. Heathershaw, N. Megoran, M. Reeves, D. Lewis, Discourses of Danger and Western Policy Towards Central Asia in Light of Recent Events, “Russia and Eurasia Programme Seminar Summary”, Chatham House, 13.09.2010. 

B. Janusz, The Caspian Sea Legal Status and Regime Problems, Russia and Eurasia Programme REP BP 05/02, Chatham House August 2005.
M. Musioł, Post-Soviet Central Asia as a Unique Regional Security Complex, The Polish Institute of International Affairs, Warsaw 2015. 

14.05.2018 (1,5 h): 15.30-17.00 Environmental and natural challenges in Central Asia
Ch. Conrad, S. W. Dech, M. Hafeez, J. Lamers, Ch. Martius, G. Strunz, Mapping and assessing water use in a Central Asian irrigation system by utilizing MODIS remote sensing products, Springer, 2007.
GCOS, JICA, NASA, UNEP, World Bank - Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program.
B. Ketter, Seismic Velocity Structure of Central Asia from Surface-Wave Dispersion, ftp://ftp.eas.slu.edu/pub/incoming/Theses/Ketter_SLU_MSci_99.pdf
Z. Zhurumbetova, The Aral Sea and its challenges, EC IFAS, http://www.ec-ifas.org.
Our World Nuclear Test (film).
B. Mosello, Water in Central Asia: A Prospect of Conflict or Cooperation?, http://www.princeton.edu/jpia/past- issues-1/2008/9.pdf. 

21.05.2018 (1,5 h): Case studies and presentation of students projects 15.30-17.10 

28.05.2018 (1,5 h): Case studies and presentation of students projects 15.30-17.00 

28.05.2018 Summary and final assessment 

Proposed and facultative methods and technics for students presentations:

Descriptive analysis 

Qualitative analysis
Historical analysis
Scenario methods
Statistical methods
Comparative analysis 

Case study

SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses Opportunities, Threats)
PEST Analysis (Political, Economic, Socio-Cultural, and Technological factors)

Strucutre of students projects:

  • elaboration of the presentation outline - agenda (table of contents, introduction, sections, questions and problems, conclusions, bibliography);
  • own research;
  • recommended form: multimedia presentation - max. 10 slides.
  • the last slide should contain verification questions (at least 2) for students to repeat and
  • consolidate the scope which was elaborated in the presentation.

 

Selected topics – students presentations:

 

  • Migration problem in Central Asia after the break up of the Soviet Union
  • Central Asia terrorism: its global and regional impact
  • Kazakhstan as a potential regional leader in Central Asia
  • Nuclear weapon free zone in Central Asia
  • Ferghana Valley as a challenge for Central Asian stability
  • Secularization or return to Islam - change in the Post-Soviet social reality in Central Asia
  • Caspian Sea’s security dilemma
  • One Belt One Road Initiative – implications for Central Asian states 

 

Aims of the course: 

Student can correctly interpret basic phenomena (cultural, political, legal and economic ones) that occur within contemporary international relations and in Central Asia. Student on the basis of organized knowledge can construct elementary scenarios of development of processes and phenomena in Central Asia. 

Teaching methods: 

The main assumption of this course is to expand knowledge about divers and basic analytical and theoretical aspects and concepts regarding the Regional Security Complex Theory and Central Asia. This crucial assumption will be achieved through the following workshop teaching methods listed below: 

 

  • in-tutorial thesis-oriented presentation;
  • discussions and debates;
  • individual consultations;
  • group work; 
  • final project. 
Evaluation & Completion: 

The final course completion will be based upon student activity, assessment of each projects, solving case studies, quality of presentations, active or passive participation in discussions, simulations, strategy games, multitask work, debates. The final Assessment will also include the manner and standard of newspapers analysis, text analysis, analytical thinking and reasoning and posing questions and presenting findings. 

Basic Literature: 
  1. Abazov R., The Political Culture Of Central Asia: A Case Of Kyrgyzstan, “Political Culture Case Studies, Conflict Studies Research Centre”, March 2003.

  2. Aras B., Polat R. K., From Conflict to Cooperation: Desecuritization of Turkey’s Relations with Syria and Iran, Security Dialogue, vol. 39, no. 5, SAGE, 2008.

  3. Bissenova A., Construction boom and banking crisis in Kazakhstan, Bi-weekly briefing, Vol. 11 No. 11 3, “Central Asia-Caucasus Institute & Silk Road Studies Program”, Washington, 2009.

  4. Blank S., Rethinking Central Asian Security, China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly, Volume 6, No. 2, Central Asia-Caucasus Institute & Silk Road Studies Program, 2008.

  5. Bohr A., Central Asia: responding to the multi-vectoring game, Chatham House 22.02.2010.

  6. Brzeziński Z., The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives, Basic Books,

    Nowy Jork 1997.

  7. Bueger Ch., Security as Performation: Securitization, Piracy and the United Nations Security Council, bi-

    annual conference of the Standing Group for International Relations of the ECPR, Stockholm, European

    University Institute and Institute for Development and Peace, 2010.

  8. Bueger Ch., Stockbruegger J., Governing piracy: macrosecuritization, governance and maritime space,

    52nd Annual Conference of the International Studies Association, Montreal, March 2011.

  9. Buzan B., Hansen L., International security, SAGE, London 2007.

  10. Buzan B., Waever O., de Wilde J., Environmental, Economic and Societal Security, Working Papers 10,

    Centre for Peace and Conflict Research, Copenhagen 1995.

  11. Buzan B., Wæver O., Macrosecuritisation and Security Constellations: Reconsidering Scale in

    Securitisation Theory, “Review of International Studies”, 35(2), 2009.

  12. BuzanB.,WaeverO.,RegionsandPowers.TheStructureofInternationalSecurity,“CambridgeStudiesin

    International Relations”, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2003.

  13. Buzan B., Wæver O., de Wilde J., Security: a new framework for analysis, Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner

    Publishers, 1998.

  14. Corruption Index, Annual Report 2016, Transparency International, http://www.transparency.org.

  15. Coskun B. B., Analysing Desecuritisation: The Case of the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Education and Water

    Management, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011.

  16. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013, United States Department of State Publication Bureau of

    Counterterrorism, April 2014.

  17. Disputes,non-violentcrises,violentcrises,limitedwars,wars,ConflictBarometer/HeidelbergInstituteon

    International Conflict Research, 2016.

  18. Farell M., Hettne B., Van Langenhove L. (red.), Global Politics of Regionalism. Theory and Practice,

    London-Ann Arbor 2005.

  19. FishmanB.,ForestJ.J.F.,WMDandthefourdimensionsofal-Qaeda,[in:]M.Ranstorp,M.Normark(ed.),

    Unconventional Weapons and International Terrorism. Challenges and new approaches, Routledge, New

    York 2009.

  20. Floyd R., Security and the Environment. Securitisation Theory and US Environmental Security Policy,

    Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2010.

  21. Frerks G., New security challenges: broadening the Pugwash agenda?, Conflict Prevention and Conflict

Management, Centre for Conflict Studies, Utrecht University, 2006.

  1. Hansen L., Security as Practice. Discourse Analysis and the Bosnian War, Routledge, London 2006.

  2. Hönninghausen L., Frey M., Peacock J., Steiner N., Regionalism in the Age of Globalism. Volume 1

    Concepts of Regionalism, Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures, 2005.

  3. de Humboldt A., Asie Centrale: Recherches sur les chaînes de montagnes et la climatologie comparée,

    Paris, 1843.

  4. Hurrell A., Regionalism in theoretical perspective: regional organization and international world order,

    [in:] L. Fawcett, A. Hurrell (ed.), Regionalism in World Politics, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1997.

  5. Lake D. A., Regional security complexes: A systems approach, [in:] D. A. Lake, P. M. Morgan (ed.)

    Regional Orders: Building Security in a New World, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.

  6. Katzenstein P. J. A., A World of Regions: Asia and Europe in the American Imperium, Cornell University

    Press, Ithaca, London 2005.

  7. Katzenstein P., The Culture of National Security: Norms and Identity in World Politics, Columbia

    University Press, New York 2005.

  8. Mieß Ch., The discourse on security – a comparative analysis TV-Newscasts and the Diffusion of

    Perspectives in the United States of America and Germany, 7th Pan-European International Relations

    Conference of the ECPR, Stockholm 2010.

  9. Number of fatalities due to terrorist attacks worldwide between 2006 and 2012,

    http://www.statista.com/statistics/202871/number-of-fatalities-by-terror....

  10. Papava V., Eurasia versus Central Caucaso-Asia: on the geopolitics of Central Caucaso-Asia, CICERO

    Foundation Great Debate Paper No. 09/8, December 2009.

  11. PeimaniH.,RegionalSecurityandtheFutureofCentralAsia:TheCompetitionofIran,Turkey,andRussia,

    Westport, CT: Praeger, 1998.

  12. Pomfret R., Central Asia after Two Decades of Independence, Working Paper No. 2010/53, UNU-WIDER

    2010, United Nations University, May 2010.

  13. ReynoldsJ.,AnempiricalapplicationofRegionalSecurityComplexTheory:thesecuritizationdiscoursein

    China’s relations with Central Asia and Russia, Central European University, 2009.

  14. Ryabtsev V., Why Is There No “Security Complex” in the Black Sea-Caucasus Region, The Centre for

    OSCE Research (CORE), “OSCE Yearbook 2006.

  15. Shimizu T., Assessing the access to forest resources for improving livelihoods in West and Central Asia

    countries, “Access to Natural Resources Sub-Programme”, Working Paper 33, FAO, 2006.

  16. Söderbaum F., The Political Economy of Regionalism. The Case of Southern Africa, Palgrave Macmillan,

    2004.

  17. StarrS.F.,AGreaterCentralAsiaPartnershipforAfghanistanandItsNeighbors,“CentralAsia–Caucasus

    Institute, Silk Road Studies Program, Silk Road Paper”, March 2005.

  18. Starr F., A Partnership for Central Asia, “Foreign Affairs”, 84(4), 2005.

  19. Tavares R., Understanding Regional Peace and Security. A Framework for analysis, Intellecta Docusys,

    Göteborg University, 2006.

  20. TaureckR.,Securitisationtheory–thestorysofar:Theoreticalinheritanceandwhatitmeanstobeapost-

    structural realist, the 4th Annual CEEISA Convention University of Tartu, 25-27.06.2006.

  21. Terrorism & Political Violence Map, AON plc, www.aon.com/terrorismmap.

  22. VuoriJ.A.,Howtodosecuritywithwords.AGrammarofSecuritisationinthePeople’sRepublicofChina,

    Turun Yliopisto, University of Turku, Turku 2011.

  23. Waever O., Securitizing Sectors?: Reply to Eriksson, Cooperation and Conflict 34(3), 1999.

  24. Wilkinson C., The Copenhagen School on Tour in Kyrgyzstan: Is Securitization Theory Useable Outside

    Europe?, „Security Dialogue”, 38(1), 2007.

  25. Zenn J., Kazakhstan’s counter-terrorism strategies for the post-2013 security environment, The Central

    Asia-“Caucasus Institute and Silk Road Studies Program Joint Center”. 

Additional Literature: 
  1. Balzacq T., Constructivism and Securitization Studies, [w:] Cavelty M. D., Mauer V. (red.), The Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Routledge, Abingdon (UK), New York 2010.

  2. Blank S., Rethinking Central Asian Security, China and Eurasia Forum Quarterly, Volume 6, No. 2, Central Asia-Caucasus Institute & Silk Road Studies Program, 2008.

  3. Falkingham J., The End of the Rollercoaster? Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Central Asia and the Caucasus, Blackwell Publishing Ltd., 2005.

  4. Floyd R., Security and the Environment. Securitisation Theory and US Environmental Security Policy, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2010.

  5. Katzenstein P., The Culture of National Security: Norms and Identity in World Politics, Columbia University Press, New York 2005.

  6. Mosello B., Water in Central Asia: A Prospect of Conflict or Cooperation?, http://www.princeton.edu/jpia/past-issues-1/2008/9.pdf

  7. Papava V., Eurasia versus Central Caucaso-Asia: on the geopolitics of Central Caucaso-Asia, CICERO Foundation Great Debate Paper No. 09/8, December 2009.

  8. Pomfret R., Central Asia after Two Decades of Independence, Working Paper No. 2010/53, UNU-WIDER 2010, United Nations University, May 2010.

  9. Reynolds J., An empirical application of Regional Security Complex Theory: the securitization discourse in China’s relations with Central Asia and Russia, Central European University, 2009.

  10. Söderbaum F., The Political Economy of Regionalism. The Case of Southern Africa, Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.