Introduction to Global Studies (workshop)

General Information
See description for schedule
Teacher: 
dr Marek Musioł
October - January
Room: 
306
ECTS: 
2
Number of Hours: 
15
Thursday 15:30 - 17:00
Preliminary requirements: 

The preliminary requirements in order to take part in this workshop, refer to the general knowledge concerning main factors and aspects ruling the international relations in the era of globalization or de-globalization. It is also highly recommended to track current, international developments and know the history particularly after the Second World War and the Cold War that might influence on a contemporary perspective. The general knowledge on global studies and the globalization process, geopolitics, economy, and political science might be also very helpful.

Course Description: 

 

15.30 – 17.00 (11.10.2018 (1,5h) ; 25.10.2018 (1,5h); 22.11.2018 (1,5h) ; 13.12.2018 (1,5h) ; 10.01.2019 (1,5h) ; 17.01.2019 (2h) ; 24.01.2019 (2h)

 

The aim of this workshop is to set basic aspects of Global Studies, including historical background and evolution process. It will show various angles of theoretical, conceptual analysis and trends in this field of studies. Finally, it will bring closer the necessary definitions and approaches that may enable students to distinguish Global Studies from other existing disciplines. The presented literature might be also changed by the teacher and the final list with positions in electronic versions or hard copies will be provided a week before the exact meeting.    

All workhops are scheduled for Thursdays in the academic year 2017/2018 (with the accordance to below dates and hours). Any possible changes will be announced by the teacher before each meeting. Exact rooms will be provided soon. Students should not use and prepare any position from the presented literature before first meeting.  

Introduction

  • how to complete this workshop - organizational aspects and requirements.
  • a team work and first step to integrate better: icebreaker game – it is not easy to communicate.
  • a general introduction to Global Studies at the University of Wrocław.

Basics of Global Studies

  • main assumptions and definitions
  • a historical background and evolution
  • crucial angles
  1. M. B. Steger, The Global Studies. Reader, Oxford University Press, Second Edition, Oxford 2015.
  2. R. J. Jackson, Global Politics in the 21st Century, Cambridge University Press, New York 2016.
  3. M. J. Green, N. Szechenyi, A Global History of Twientieth Century. Legacies and Lessons from Six National Perspectives, Center For Strategic and International Studies, Rowman and Littlefield, Washington 2017.
  4. R. Devetak, A. Burke, J. George, An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, New York 2014.
  5. S. Smallman, K. Brown, Introduction to International and Global Studies, The University of North Carolina 2011.
  6. P. J. Campbell, A. MacKinnon, C. R. Stevens, An Introduction to Global Studies, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. 

Theorizing Global Studies

  • selected theories and their visions of global reality and perspective
  1. E. Darian-Smith and P. C. McCarty, The Global Turn. Theories, Research Designs, and Methods for Global Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara 2017.
  2. M. Herren, P. Manning, P. C. McCarty, M. Middell, E. Vanhaute, Potentials and Challenges of Global Studies for the 21st Century, Global Europe – Basel Papers on Europe in a Global Perspective, Basel 2014.
  3. J. Baylis, J. Wirtz, C. S. Gray, E. Cohen, The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, Sixth Edition, Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 1-15, chapter 6-13.
  4. M. D. Cavelty, V. Mauer, The Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Routledge, New York 2010.
  5. M. B. Steger, P. Battersby, J. M. Siracusa, The Sage Handbook of Globalization, Vol. 1, Sage Publications, London 2014.
  6. M. B. Steger, P. Battersby, J. M. Siracusa, The Sage Handbook of Globalization, Vol. 2, Sage Publications, London 2014.

Debate: Are we now living in a globalizing or de-globalizing world?

The UN System and global security in the post-Cold War era

  1. European Security Strategy, A Secure Europe in a Better Word, Brussels, 12 December 2003.
  2. B. McSweeney, Security, Identity and Interests. A Sociology of International Relations, Cambridge, New York 2004, p. 13-22.
  3. M. Stone, Security According to Buzan: A Comprehensive Security Analysis, Columbia University, New York 2009.
  4. K. Booth, Theory of World Security, Cambridge, New York 2007, p. 95-110.
  5. P.D. Williams (ed.), Security Studies. An Introduction, Routledge, New York 2008, p. 5-10 and 438-453. 
  6. M. Kaldor, In Defence of New Wars, Stability, 2(1): 4, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/sta.at.
  7. P. J. Campbell, A. MacKinnon, C. R. Stevens, An Introduction to Global Studies, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

Case studies and presentation of students projects

The Great European Disaster Movie – discussion

Final assessment

 

Proposed and facultative methods and technics for students presentations:

  • Descriptive analysis
  • Qualitative analysis
  • Historical analysis
  • Scenario methods
  • Statistical methods
  • Comparative analysis
  • Case study

 

Strucutre of students projects:

  • elaboration of the presentation outline - agenda (table of contents, introduction, sections, questions and problems, conclusions, bibliography);
  • own research;
    • recommended form: multimedia presentation - max. 10 slides.

 

Selected topics – students presentations:

  • Migration problem in Europe in 2011-2017 as a global challenge.
  • Jihad 2.0: the global role of social networking sites in the propaganda of terrorist groups - the case study of ISIS in 2013-2017.
  • The status of the Kurdish diaspora in the Middle East and its right for self-determination – global and contemporary perspective.
  • Global climate change, ecological challenges and security in the world in 2005-2017.
  • Global phenomenon and advantages and disadvantages of using private military companies in armed conflicts in the period of 2003 -2016.
  • Epidemics and their impact on global security - Ebola virus in Africa in 2013-2016.
Aims of the course: 

Student can correctly interpret basic phenomena (cultural, political, legal and economic ones) that occur within contemporary international relations. Student on the basis of organized knowledge can construct elementary scenarios of development of processes and phenomena in the area of Global Studies.

Teaching methods: 

The main assumption of this course is to expand knowledge about divers and basic analytical and theoretical aspects and concepts regarding Global Studies. This crucial assumption will be achieved through the following workshop teaching methods listed below:

  • in-tutorial thesis-oriented presentation;
  • discussions and debates;
  • individual consultations;
  • group work;
  • final project.
Evaluation & Completion: 

The participation in the workshop of Introduction to Global Studies is mandatory for all students. Students are expected to keep up with reading materials and conclusions presented during workshops. During workshops students should be active. The evaluation of each students will be based upon their participation in debates and other proposed forms of the course. Students will be also asked to prepare and present case studies of various phenomenon and processes devoted to Global Studies. The final evaluation will be based on students attendance and contribution to all proposed activities and debates. Due to the fact that the workshop will last 15 hours, only one absence is possible.

Introductory Reading: 
  1. Baylis J., Wirtz J., Gray C. S., Cohen E., The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, Sixth Edition, Oxford University Press, 2014.
  2. Booth K., Theory of World Security, Cambridge, New York 2007.
  3. Campbell P. J., MacKinnon A., Stevens C. R., An Introduction to Global Studies, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
  4. Cavelty M. D., Mauer V., The Routledge Handbook of Security Studies, Routledge, New York 2010.
  5. Darian-Smith E., McCarty P. C., The Global Turn. Theories, Research Designs, and Methods for Global Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara 2017.
  6. Devetak R., Burke A., George J., An Introduction to International Relations, Cambridge University Press, New York 2014.
  7. European Security Strategy, A Secure Europe in a Better World, Brussels, 12 December 2003.
  8. Green M. J., Szechenyi N., A Global History of Twientieth Century. Legacies and Lessons from Six National Perspectives, Center For Strategic and International Studies, Rowman and Littlefield, Washington 2017.
  9. Herren M., Manning P., McCarty P. C., Middell M., Vanhaute E., Potentials and Challenges of Global Studies for the 21st Century, Global Europe – Basel Papers on Europe in a Global Perspective, Basel 2014.
  10. Jackson R. J., Global Politics in the 21st Century, Cambridge University Press, New York 2016.
  11. Kaldor M., In Defence of New Wars, Stability, 2(1): 4, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/sta.at.
  12. McSweeney B., Security, Identity and Interests. A Sociology of International Relations, Cambridge, New York 2004.
  13. Reus-Smit Ch., Snidal D., The Oxford Handbook of International Relations, Oxford University Press, 2010.
  14. Smallman S., Brown K., Introduction to International and Global Studies, The University of North Carolina 2011.
  15. Steger M. B., The Global Studies. Reader, Oxford University Press, Second Edition, Oxford 2015.
  16. Steger M. B., Battersby P., Siracusa J. M., The Sage Handbook of Globalization, Vol. 1, Sage Publications, London 2014.
  17. Steger M. B., Battersby P., Siracusa J. M., The Sage Handbook of Globalization, Vol. 2, Sage Publications, London 2014.
  18. Stone M., Security According to Buzan: A Comprehensive Security Analysis, Columbia University, New York 2009.
  19. Williams P. D. (ed.), Security Studies. An Introduction, Routledge, New York 2008.